Lulie: a short story

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Debbie and Julie

Check Nearby Stores. Style No. Designed by Lulie Wallace in collaboration with Anthropologie, this floral bedding lends a splash of color to your little one's bedroom. About Lulie Wallace Charleston-based artist Lulie Wallace creates dazzling acrylic paintings with the idea that the less perfect the subject, the more beautiful the finished product. Possessing panache for floral compositions like these vividly rendered florals, her signature color combinations set apart each piece as truly unique.

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Merchandise must not be worn, washed, or altered. All tags must be attached and items must be returned in original packaging. Most merchandise can be returned within 60 days of the purchase date. A refund will be issued to the original form of payment at the original selling price.

If returned after 60 days, a merchandise credit will be issued for the the original selling price. For fast and free returns, find your local store. Prefer to return by mail? Just to note: shoes, bedding, curtains, and swimwear must be shipped back to our warehouse and cannot be returned to a store. Good news — online returns for these items are free! In utilizing the naturalistic style, the author goes against the dominant theatrical idea that says that characters should be written with only one primary motivation. The play is preceded by an author's preface which discusses Strindberg's ideas of naturalism and how they apply to the play.

Strindberg writes about aristocracy and classism in the preface arguably more than in the play itself. He describes both Jean and Miss Julie as stereotypical representations of their classes and society. Miss Julie is especially condemned by Strindberg "as a modern character which does not mean that the man-hating half-woman has not existed in every age Zola's term for naturalism is la nouvelle formule.

The three primary principles of naturalism faire vrai, faire grand and faire simple are:. Strindberg believed that French playwrights had been unable to achieve naturalism, and he felt that he could do it. Miss Julie is not only successful as a naturalistic drama, but it is a play that has achieved the rare distinction of being performed on stages all over the world every year since it was written in The play was written as Strindberg was creating a new theatre of his own, the Scandinavian Naturalistic Theatre, which would be founded in Copenhagen.

Miss Julie would be the premier offering. Strindberg's wife, Siri von Essen , would star in the title role, and she would also be the artistic director. After Strindberg agreed to a small amount of censorship, the play was published a few weeks before the first production.

The first English translations also contain these censored excisions. For example, the first audiences were spared the shock of hearing Miss Julie, in an angry moment, compare making love to Jean to an act of bestiality. With disastrous timing for the new theatre, the censors announced during the dress rehearsal that Miss Julie would be forbidden.

Becky Mushko

However, Strindberg managed to get around the censors by having Miss Julie premiere a few days later at the Copenhagen University Student Union. Miss Julie: Strong-willed daughter of the Count who owns the estate. Raised by her late mother to "think like and act like a man," she is a confused individual: she is aware of the power she holds, but switches between being above the servants and flirting with Jean, her father's manservant.

Plot Overview

She longs to fall from her pillar, an expression symbolically put across as a recurring dream she has. Jean: Manservant to the Count. He tells a story of seeing Miss Julie many times as a child and loving her even then, but the truth of the story is later denied there is good evidence both for and against its veracity. Jean left the town and traveled widely, working many different jobs as he went, before finally returning to work for the count. He has aspirations to rise from his station in life and manage his own hotel, and Miss Julie is part of his plan.

He is alternately kind and callous. Despite his aspirations, he is rendered servile by the mere sight of the count's gloves and boots. Christine or Kristine : The cook in the Count's household. She is devoutly religious and apparently betrothed to Jean, although they refer to this marriage almost jokingly.

The Count: Miss Julie's father. He is never seen, but his gloves and his boots are on stage, serving as a reminder of his power. When a bell sounds, his presence is also noted more strongly. The play opens with Jean walking onto the stage, the set being the kitchen of the manor. He drops the Count's boots off to the side but still within view of the audience; his clothing shows that he is a valet.

Jean talks to Christine about Miss Julie's peculiar behavior. He considers her mad since she went to the barn dance, danced with the gamekeeper, and tried to waltz with Jean, a mere servant of the Count. Christine delves into the background of Miss Julie, stating how, unable to face her family after the humiliation of breaking her engagement, she stayed behind to mingle with the servants at the dance instead of going with her father to the Midsummer's Eve celebrations. The incident, apparently witnessed by Jean, was similar to training a dog to jump through a hoop.

Short Stories All the Time: Doris Lessing, "Debbie and Julie"

Jean takes out a bottle of fine wine with a "yellow seal" and reveals, by the way he flirts with her, that he and Christine are engaged. Noticing a stench, Jean asks what Christine is cooking so late on Midsummer's Eve. The pungent mixture turns out to be an abortifacient for Miss Julie's dog, which was impregnated by the gatekeeper's mongrel.

Jean calls Miss Julie "too stuck-up in some ways and not proud enough in others," traits apparently inherited from her mother. Despite her character flaws, Jean finds Miss Julie beautiful or perhaps simply a stepping stone to achieve his lifelong goal of owning an inn. When Miss Julie enters and asks Christine if the "meal" has finished cooking, Jean instantly shapes up, becoming charming and polite.

Jokingly, he asks if the women are gossiping about secrets or making a witch's broth for seeing Miss Julie's future suitor. After more niceties, Miss Julie invites Jean once more to dance the waltz, at which point he hesitates, pointing out that he already promised Christine a dance and that the gossip generated by such an act would be savage. Almost offended by this response, she justifies her request by pulling rank: she is the lady of the house and must have the best dancer as her partner. Then, insisting that rank does not matter, she convinces Jean to waltz with her.

When they return, Miss Julie recounts a dream of climbing up a pillar and being unable to get down. Jean responds with a story of creeping into her walled garden as a child—he sees it as "the Garden of Eden, guarded by angry angels with flaming swords"—and gazing at her longingly from under a pile of stinking weeds.

He says he was so distraught with this unrequitable love, after seeing her at a Sunday church service, that he tried to die beautifully and pleasantly by sleeping in a bin of oats strewn with elderflowers, as sleeping under an elder tree was thought to be dangerous. At this point Jean and Miss Julie notice some servants heading up to the house, singing a song that mocks the pair of them.

They hide in Jean's room. Although Jean swears he won't take advantage of her there, when they emerge later it becomes apparent that the two have had sex. Now they are forced to figure out how to deal with it, as Jean theorizes that they can no longer live in the same household—he feels they will be tempted to continue their relationship until they are caught.

Now he confesses that he was only pretending when he said he had tried to commit suicide out of love of her.